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Why Has it Taken 50 Years For the Documents Found in Antarctica in 1962 to be Published?



The answer is in fact quite simple. The documents found in the 21, so-called “Haakon” Urns (or 18 to be precise, since the seals on three of them were missing), first of all had to be deciphered and catalogued. In view of the vast amount of material they contained, this could have taken up to 20 years. As it happened, the events of 1976 stopped all further work on the findings. But even so, enough had been done on one of the most important documents, “The Song of Gorin” (an epic poem of vast proportions) that publication could have gone ahead as planned in 1974.

However, it was at this time that bitter disagreement broke out between members of the Editorial Committee, chaired by the eminent cryptologist Professor Harkwood. Three of its members favoured transcribing and re-telling the story in the “Song” in a way which would make it accessible to the largest possible audience. For not only does it graphically describe the dramatic events of this pre-glacial age which laid the very foundations of the human race but it also gave a unique insight into the origins of some of our most ancient legends.

This “popularised” approach was vehemently challenged by Professor Harkwood and another member of the Committee, arguing that it “cheapened” the serious scientific research they were engaged in. He stated at the time that he would “do anything” to prevent publication from going ahead in this form, arguing that the findings of this research should only be made available to academics and research institutes.

As we now know, Professor Harkwood prevailed. It was only his death in August 2011 that at last made it possible to reveal everything contained in “The Song of Gorin”. The long awaited publication of the first volume finally took place in April 2014. Entitled “Zandernatis Volume One – Pre-Destination” it at last gave us a first inkling of what all this is about. And its far-reaching implications.

The actual “re-telling” of this monumental story will also be accompanied by a variety of documents and supplementary background material (interviews, press cuttings, analysis by various experts, etc.). This is designed to put what might, on the surface, appear to be just another “fantasy novel” (as Professor Harkwood feared) into the context of the controversy and soul-searching it has generated – and will continue to generate.


ARTICLES

Why Has it Taken 50 Years For the Documents Found in Antarctica in 1962 to be Published?



The answer is in fact quite simple. The documents found in the 21, so-called “Haakon” Urns (or 18 to be precise, since the seals on three of them were missing), first of all had to be deciphered and catalogued. In view of the vast amount of material they contained, this could have taken up to 20 years. As it happened, the events of 1976 stopped all further work on the findings. But even so, enough had been done on one of the most important documents, “The Song of Gorin” (an epic poem of vast proportions) that publication could have gone ahead as planned in 1974.

However, it was at this time that bitter disagreement broke out between members of the Editorial Committee, chaired by the eminent cryptologist Professor Harkwood. Three of its members favoured transcribing and re-telling the story in the “Song” in a way which would make it accessible to the largest possible audience. For not only does it graphically describe the dramatic events of this pre-glacial age which laid the very foundations of the human race but it also gave a unique insight into the origins of some of our most ancient legends.

This “popularised” approach was vehemently challenged by Professor Harkwood and another member of the Committee, arguing that it “cheapened” the serious scientific research they were engaged in. He stated at the time that he would “do anything” to prevent publication from going ahead in this form, arguing that the findings of this research should only be made available to academics and research institutes.

As we now know, Professor Harkwood prevailed. It was only his death in August 2011 that at last made it possible to reveal everything contained in “The Song of Gorin”. The long awaited publication of the first volume finally took place in April 2014. Entitled “Zandernatis Volume One – Pre-Destination” it at last gave us a first inkling of what all this is about. And its far-reaching implications.

The actual “re-telling” of this monumental story will also be accompanied by a variety of documents and supplementary background material (interviews, press cuttings, analysis by various experts, etc.). This is designed to put what might, on the surface, appear to be just another “fantasy novel” (as Professor Harkwood feared) into the context of the controversy and soul-searching it has generated – and will continue to generate.


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